Redmond Regional Medical Center has been named a “Door-to-Needle Time” hospital award winner for timely response in administering life-saving care and medications to patients who have had a stroke. This award was presented by the Georgia Coverdell Acute Stroke Registry. Redmond is one of only 12 Georgia hospitals to receive this award.

Door-to-needle time refers to the time between a patient entering the emergency room with stroke symptoms, and the time a patient is given the medication that could help save their life. A team of emergency health professionals will determine, based on a thorough clinical assessment, if a patient is a candidate for this medication. For stroke patients, administering this medication could mean the difference between life and death. The faster the patient receives the medication, the more likely it is to be effective.

The “Door-to-Needle Time” award is given to hospitals that have entered a minimum of five patients in 2015 with an average door-to-needle time of less than 45 minutes. New this year, the award is also offered to hospitals that have shown a 20% decrease in door-to-needle time compared to the previous year. Comparing 2014 data to that of 2015, Redmond was one of four hospitals that accomplished both of these criteria. “This recognition further supports Redmond’s continual commitment to elevating and improving the care we provide through the establishment of multi-disciplinary teams,” said Martine Osselaer, RN, MSN, Redmond Assistant Chief Nursing Officer.

At Redmond, there are standard protocols used when assessing a patient who might be having a stroke. The stroke team at Redmond follows these standard protocols based upon best practices and national guidelines. Each patient is assessed individually, and by following these standard protocols, it enables the stroke team at Redmond to give patients the best care possible. “Receiving this recognition is a major achievement that validates the quality of care we provide,” said Melody Fennell, RN, BSN, Redmond Stroke Coordinator.

May is national stroke awareness month. As a Primary Stroke Center of Excellence (as certified by the Joint Commission), members of Redmond’s Stroke Team provide free community education to help individuals be aware of and recognize the symptoms of a stroke - F.A.S.T. The acronym F.A.S.T. stands for Face, Arm, Speech, and Time. F.A.S.T. is taught to help individuals more easily remember that the signs of a stroke are most commonly seen in the face, arm, or speech. Time represents the need to act quickly, not only to recognize the signs of a stroke, but also to seek medical attention. Acting quickly can greatly increase an individual’s chance for a more positive outcome and potentially save one’s life.